Category Archives: Alcohol Rehab

Can I force my loved one into rehab for their addiction? 

After 10 years of working in the field of addiction treatment I have seen and learned a lot. Every day I receive phone calls from all types of people including many who have a loved one who is spiraling out of control, caught in the cycle of an addiction. An addiction to alcohol, prescription medications, heroin, methamphetamines and other drugs including marijuana. Although now legal in CA and some other states marijuana these days is stronger than ever and the number of reported cases where an individual is delusional, paranoid and hallucinating is skyrocketing. Most people minimize marijuana but let me tell you, the weed these days is no joke. At the end of the day, the substance isn’t really the most important factor. If an individual is using any type of substance and causing damage to their bodies, their families, their work life, the bottom line is that they need professional help. But what do you do if you try talking to this person and desperately try to beg and plead with them to get help but they just wont?

The simple truth is that the individual with the addiction is unlikely to change until they feel some serious pain from their own consequences.

Addicts and any of us for that matter usually don’t want to change until they themselves are faced with the harsh reality that their behavior and choices are beginning to cause them to lose any and all of the relationships, income, possessions, , their job, food and any other resources of value in their life. Most often times the loved ones in their lives can see clearly what is happening and take on all the negative emotions and consequences that the addict should be dealing with themselves.

The only way an addiction treatment center can help someone change is if an individual truly wants to change. They don’t always need to be fully excited about going into treatment, I mean who really dreams about going to rehab but you can help a loved one find their willingness to change and accept help for their drug and alcohol addiction. When a loved one rescues their addict out of the consequences of their addiction the addict really hasn’t felt the full magnitude of their own choices and behavior. You see an addict addict has an impaired brain and their frontal cortex has been damaged. That’s the part of our brain that provides us with the ability to have good judgement. When this is impaired they lose the ability to clearly understand how their addiction is not only ruining their lives but also greatly affecting their loved ones. So where most people can see that getting a DUI and getting arrested will cost substantial time and money and hardship which will likely cause them to make a different choice the next time they are faced with choosing to drink and drive or call an Uber the next time, the addict may minimize the incident if mom or dad is taking out loans to bail their son out of jail and pay for an attorney to help him reduce the penalties associated with the DUI. Consequences and clear boundaries are what make all the difference in the world when it comes to an addict finding their willingness to receive help.

For about the last year I have received a phone call every few months from the same woman with a son who is in his 40’s. She calls frantically looking for help for her son usually after something bad has just happened. She is often exhausted and overwhelmed and has  usually been bringing him food to his house and in pure emotionally agony begging her son to go to a treatment center for help.  He has now been charged with 4 DUI’s and is facing prison and she is beside herself with worry and fear. Yet her son has never called us once to do the over the phone assessment we need to do. The willingness to even talk to a counselor about how he can begin to change is not there. It looks like prison is the likely path for him. The best thing she can do is seek support and help for herself because the worry is literally killing her. This is so so sad because she is suffering so much but she could learn how to step back and focus on taking care of herself instead of putting so much energy into someone who is unwilling to change. This would likely help her son wake up and call us or another treatment center and ask for help. She could simply hand him the number and say I hope you get help and leave the number with him. He is capable of dialing the number. We will answer and all he has to do is say I need help. Some people just won’t ever seek help but that doesn’t mean that 2 people or a whole family have to suffer because 1 person is unwilling to change. Many years ago when I was caught In the codependency cycle myself and my own life was sinking because I was so focused on my significant other who had a raging alcohol addiction that I thought I could change, someone helped me by shining a light on my situation and gave me this analogy. They said, “He’s the Titanic and you are holding on to a sinking ship and he is taking you down with him. You can’t control it. “ At that moment, it clicked for me because at that time I was completely exhausted, emotionally, physically, my work was suffering, my health was suffering and I was completely obsessed to the point of totally neglecting myself in every way. I was going down too and I had to stop or I was going to end up worse off than he was. My happiness was my own responsibility but I was giving all my power away to someone else and not taking responsibility for my own life.

Addicts will take out everyone and everything in their path as long as they are allowed to. So here is where things can change…..

What about having an intervention? Will this work?

Many times per week I also receive phone calls from people who call up saying, “I have a son and our family is going to have an intervention tomorrow, we want to know if you have a bed in your facility?” This is where I want to say “WAIT! STOP RIGHT THERE, Is there a professional leading the intervention?"

Addiction is a highly complicated brain disorder that causes the brain of an addict to become hijacked. Which in turn causes the individual with the addiction to lie cheat steal and focus solely on one thing, getting more of their drug of choice and to stop at nothing until they do. Dealing with an addict requires highly skilled professionals who know that the hell they are doing. It requires a great deal of education and understanding. An intervention done by the family without a professional usually ends in a worse disaster. If you are reading this and considering doing your own intervention….. PLEASE do not do it. Stop and get some professional guidance. What is most likely to happen is a huge family argument and lots of emotions being spilled out all over the place, threats, physical fights and in the end? The addict runs off faster and harder to their first love, their drug of choice to numb the pain and sink deeper into their addiction and isolate themselves from their loved ones ever more than before. Basically a home made intervention done with inexperienced individuals will almost always cause a greater disaster than where you began. This will push your addict deeper into their addiction.

What a trained interventionist provides is a great deal of education and leadership on how to most effectively change the direction of the entire family dynamics and to help the loved ones learn what is enabling the addiction to continue and how to set proper boundaries with the addict . An interventionist will educate and walk you through the process and be there for you every step of the way. An interventionist also provides an emotionally detached person who cannot be manipulated by the addict when it comes times for the actual intervention. They are your quarterback. Don’t do it alone.

When 3 or 4 people who are close to the addict all get on the same page and simultaneously begin to get clear on what is helping and what is harming and start to say no I will no longer help you until you get some help for your addiction, then the addict loses the power to be able to manipulate their loved ones and the addict will begin to become more concerned with human survival than scoring more heroin or running off to the liquor store.

When you let a loved one move into your house and provide them food and money to keep their cell phone working, insurance covered, car payment covered, you are enabling their addiction to survive and thrive. This is harming them. It is not helping them at all.

Most people do not by any means intentionally try to bring harm to their loved one. They usually are providing for their addicts basic human needs while worrying themselves sick, secretly hoping they can control or coerce their loved one into getting help.

All the begging, pleading, criticizing, arguing and tell their loved one how much they need to get help and how hard all of this is and how they are spending all their money on trying to help them. Trying to guilt and shame them into getting help almost never works.

So how do you help a loved one find their willingness to seek help for their addiction? Clear boundaries and follow through works almost every time

Here is a simple statement that you can use for guidance.

I love you and it’s become clear that I cannot help you get past this addiction. You need help from experts who know about your illness. I can no longer provide any help to you financially, emotionally or in any way until you are willing to seek help for your addiction. I am willing to help support you financially and/or emotionally until you decide to seek help. Until then I will no longer provide any help financially and or emotionally and I will no longer allow you to live in my home, buy you food, pay for anything at all for you because it is not helping you and the stress is causing harm to me.

Now, the most important part of speaking these type of words is making 100% sure that you can and will follow through on what you speak. NEVER set a boundary and then allow anyone and especially the person who is addicted to violate the boundary. If you speak it and then don’t follow through you render yourself powerless and the addiction will gain more power over you and your loved one.

Most loved ones need help and support to actually be able to do this. It’s not easy for a parent to actually cut off any type of support and contact with their adult child who is actively destroying their life. It is natural for us all to attach to those we love and it can be excruciatingly difficult to have your adult kid begging for food or money. Excruciatingly painful to kick them out of the house and know that they are living outside in harsh conditions and not feel extreme anxiety and worry about them. These emotions are difficult and you need support from qualified people to get through this. However if you provide your loved one with the choice to either choose help or choose addiction then the choice has become theirs. It is necessary and healthy to give your loved one a choice. Choose to become healthy or choose to stay in addiction. By stepping out of the chaos and taking care of yourself by seeking support and guidance through this extremely complicated time you are helping your loved one find the survival skills within them to fight for their own life. Addiction is no joke and it takes lives every day. The drugs these days are harder and stronger than ever and if you want to help your loved one you need to seek help and put on your own oxygen mask for yourself first. Hand the consequences back to your loved one and let them deal with their life themselves. By helping them pay their bills, provide them food, provide them shelter, hire them an attorney to minimize consequences you are helping them avoid the very crisis they need to wake up and accept help.

Do You Have A Drinking Problem? Alcohol Abuse Questionnaire

Pathways -- Do You Have A Drinking Problem -- 08-23-16Do You Have A Drinking Problem?

Answering these 20 questions can give you and indication if your drinking habits are safe, at risk for a drinking problem, or harmful. This quiz was developed by the Office of Health Care Programs, Johns Hopkins University Hospital. If you regularly consume alcoholic beverages, this quiz can give you an idea of how your drinking put you into harmful patterns and indicate whether or not you have a drinking problem.

When answering, use the last 12 months as your frame of reference. Be honest with yourself because you can only benefit if your answers are accurate.  A drinking problem can lead to more serious problems with alcohol like alcohol dependence and addiction (alcoholism).

  1. Do you lose time from work from drinking?
  2. Is drinking making your home life unhappy?
  3. Do you drink because you are shy with other people?
  4. Is drinking affecting your reputation?
  5. Have you felt remorse after drinking?
  6. Have you had financial difficulties as a result of drinking?
  7. Do you turn to inferior companions and environments when drinking?
  8. Does your drinking make you careless of your family’s welfare?
  9. Has your ambition decreased since drinking?
  10. Do you crave a drink at a definite time each day?
  11. Do you want to drink the next morning?
  12. Does drinking cause you to have difficulty sleeping?
  13. Has your efficiency decreased since drinking?
  14. Is drinking jeopardizing your job or business?
  15. Do you drink to escape from worries or troubles?
  16. Do you drink alone?
  17. Have you ever had a loss of memory as a result of drinking?
  18. Has your physician ever treated you for drinking?
  19. Do you drink to build up your self-confidence?
  20. Have you ever been to a hospital or institution because of your drinking?

According to the Office of Health Care Programs, Johns Hopkins University Hospital if you answered as few as 3 of these answers with a Yes there is an indication that you have a drinking problem and your drinking patterns are harmful and considered alcohol dependent or alcoholic. If this is the case for you, then you should seriously consider seeking an evaluation by a healthcare provider or someone in the substance abuse field to discuss your drinking problem.

Alcohol Dependence Syndrome And Other Alcohol-Related Problems

Alcohol Dependence SyndromeAlcohol dependence syndrome is mental or physical dependence on drinking. Alcohol problems affect more than 16.3 million adults across the nation. People who can recognize the symptoms of alcohol dependence syndrome and similar issues can potentially save themselves and their family members from physical, mental, and social health problems. They may also be able to curtail the situation before a loved one becomes debilitated by alcohol use.

There are a variety of disorders associated with the excessive use of alcohol. Since the terms are so often misused, there’s quite a bit of confusion about the differences between them. Many people mistake alcohol abuse for alcohol dependency or alcoholism. Abuse is defined as drinking too much and/or too often. Dependency is the inability to quit. Both conditions are serious, but not being able to stop poses a bigger issue and a greater risk to the drinker.

Symptoms Of Alcohol Dependence Syndrome

Before it can be fixed, alcoholism must be noticed. There are several things to look for if you suspect someone is alcohol dependent:

  1. Blood Alcohol Level - Developing a pattern to maintain one’s blood alcohol level. People who are dependent on alcohol will start to drink at the same time every day. The point is to remain intoxicated as much as possible and avoid any symptoms of withdrawal.
  1. Prioritizing Alcohol - For addicts, the consumption of alcohol will take precedence over their wellbeing. No matter what condition their bodies or lives are in, drinking will be more important.
  1. Increased Tolerance - The more someone consumes alcohol, the higher the resistance to the effects. A noticeable increase in the amount someone is drinking could be cause for concern.
  1. Signs of Withdrawal - When the concentration of alcohol in the blood lowers, it can trigger some unpleasant side effects. Tremors, nausea, sweating, itching, muscle cramps, hallucinations, and even seizures can occur. Two to three days after cessation, the individual can experience even more severe symptoms from delirium tremens.
  1. Drinking at Strange Hours - Consuming alcohol at random times to stop or prevent withdrawal symptoms is called relief drinking. Some people will wake up in the middle of the night to drink or start with alcohol first thing in the morning.

The Consequences Of Alcohol Dependency

Routine and excessive consumption of alcohol wreaks havoc on the body. The longer that someone is dependent on alcohol, the worse the side effects become. Some of the results are irreversible and even potentially deadly.

Physical Repercussions

Alcohol addicts suffer from neurological, gastrointestinal, liver, cardiac, and skin conditions, among others. One of the most prominent risks is brain damage. The deterioration is both structural and functional, and it can lead to chemical imbalances and cognitive issues. Alcohol also increases the risk of several types of cancer—mouth, throat, and liver cancer are the most common, but it has also been linked to breast cancer.

Someone dependent on alcohol will likely have a damaged heart too. Hypoglycemia, myopathy, arrhythmias, and even cardiac failure can occur. These problems become more dangerous in older individuals, especially if they combine other poor habits such as smoking.

Mental Health Effects

Alcohol works as a depressant and can strongly alter chemistry in the brain. People who become dependent are at risk for a variety of mental health issues. Depression and anxiety are the most common, but mania, hallucinosis, and “blackouts” are recognized as well. There’s a high prevalence of alcohol use found in those who commit suicide as well, presenting a 7% lifetime risk for the addict.

Social Consequences

The most prominent social problem with alcohol dependence is traffic accidents; sufferers are often unable to access when they should and shouldn’t drive. People who drive under the influence are far more likely to wreck, and many accidents involve fatalities. Even without an accident, a DUI or DWI can affect work and social interactions. Other incidents can happen at home. Dependency on alcohol boosts the chances of violence, child abuse, homicide, and general crime.

Alcohol abuse damages personal relationships as well. Divorce can be a result of alcohol addiction, both from the psychological changes that occur and poor decisions like infidelity. It’s not uncommon for people to lose friends in direct relation to their behavior.

Occupational Dangers

High-stress jobs like this are more likely to lead to alcohol abuse. With alcohol dependency syndrome, the individual’s performance can suffer greatly. He or she may be unable to focus because of withdrawal symptoms or simply because of the “urge” to go home and drink. Alcohol dependence syndrome should be treated as early as possible to increase the likelihood of long-term success.